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As such then is his intention, it becomes our duty, in all our sufferings, not to regard so much the visible hand of an unjust creature, as the invisible hand of a just God:

Richard Challoner, Meditations, August 17 entry

Hello Readers, hope all’s well. Time for another #shorts post.

Today’s quick tidbit once again comes from Richard Challoner’s daily reader, Meditations. The full title being: Considerations Upon Christian Truths and Christian Duties: Digested Into Meditations for Every Day in the Year.

By the way, I want everyone to know Meditations is a book in the public domain—it’s free!! You can read it for free as a PDF (if you want a print copy like I prefer, you have to buy one). Check out the free PDF HERE.

If you download your own free copy, you can follow along with the entries I write about, or you can read an entry every day yourself.

Now, on to today’s passage.

Remember Who’s in Charge of it all

Today’s post comes from the Meditations entry for August 17 (long-time Readers know I write my blog posts weeks in advance). The topic is: Resignation to the Will of God in all our Sufferings. Let’s see what Challoner has to say about it:

On Resignation to the Will of God in all our Sufferings (August 17)

Consider first, (as an infallible truth) that nothing happens in the world (sin excepted) that does not come directly from the hand of God, or is not the effect of his holy will:—all our sufferings, of what kind soever, are ordained by him, and pass through his hands, before they can reach us. This is so true, that even those sufferings, which seem to proceed immediately from the wickedness of men, are in effect sent by the ordinance of God; who although he abhors the malicious designs of the men, or devils, whom he suffers to afflict or persecute us, yet he most certainly not only permits, but absolutely wills the afflictions, trials, or punishments, which we suffer on these occasions. As such then is his intention, it becomes our duty, in all our sufferings, not to regard so much the visible hand of an unjust creature, as the invisible hand of a just God: […]

Richard Challoner, Meditations, August 17 entry

It’s that last part I like the most. When bad things happen, we need to focus on the invisible hand of God, not the visible hand of a human perpetrator. Because everything happens for a reason.

Nothing happens in this world without God either causing it or allowing it; I’ve said this a few times on my blog. It’s hard to remember this truth when terrible tragedies or infuriating injustices afflict us. Those are the times when this Christian teaching goes right out the window, because all our thoughts and emotions are fixated on either relief or revenge. Relief from the suffering of our tragedies, or revenge on those who’ve hurt us. Sometimes both at the same time.

But when we’re suffering, if we could hold on to the truth that God is the source of everything that happens to us, our suffering would be easier to endure. Because we would know He will bring it to a favorable conclusion for us.

If only we could keep this Truth in mind when we need it most (which is when it’s hardest to remember). Because if everything that happens is God’s will, whether He causes it or allows it, then we can have Faith that whatever happens is for our ultimate good. We don’t always understand what God is doing, as His ways are higher than our ways (Isaiah 55:8). But we know from Scripture that God is always working in all things for the good of those who love him (Romans 8:28).

Consider 2dly, that all our sufferings not only come from the hand of God, our heavenly Father, but are also designed by his infinite wisdom for our greater good.

Richard Challoner, Meditations, August 17 entry

Does any of this sound familiar to you, reader?? I bet it probably does. There are a few passages in the New Testament about suffering, and how it’s for our ultimate benefit. One that I occasionally quote on my blog is Romans 5:3-4. Suffering produces endurance, endurance produces character, and character produces hope. Since all our suffering ultimately comes from God, of course this would be the case. We lose sight of this in the moment, because our suffering is so painful, but when the bad times end we may look back and see how God was working for our sake the whole time.

(3) But not only that! We even take pride in our problems [suffering], because we know that trouble produces endurance, (4) endurance produces character, and character produces hope.

Romans 5:3-4 (CEB)

If you’re going through a period of suffering right now, try your best to remember what we’ve talked about today. Remember what Richard Challoner says. And also remember that nothing lasts forever in this temporary world; good or bad, nothing lasts forever. Everything has an end.

That’s it for #shorts #14. Stay tuned for more #shorts all this month.


Well that’s all for this week. If you enjoyed today’s post, be sure to Subscribe using the link below. And please consider Supporting My Blog using the Tip Jar. Any amount is much appreciated!

Until next time, be strong and do good!

Your new best friend in Christ,

99:9

<<<EXALT THE LORD OUR GOD AND WORSHIP AT HIS HOLY HILL; FOR THE LORD OUR GOD IS HOLY>>>


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